Local

Looking Back: June 2, 2010

In 1900, Melville Clark, an experienced piano manufacturer, opened the Apollo player piano factory in DeKalb. They also produced the QRS Perforated Music Rolls. By 1913, Clark's factory employed about 350 workers. Melville Clark died in 1918, and the following year Wurlitzer purchased the factory.
In 1900, Melville Clark, an experienced piano manufacturer, opened the Apollo player piano factory in DeKalb. They also produced the QRS Perforated Music Rolls. By 1913, Clark's factory employed about 350 workers. Melville Clark died in 1918, and the following year Wurlitzer purchased the factory.

120 years ago

May 31, 1890
A drive through the country in the direction of Waterman on one of these bright days gives one a glimpse of one of the fairest scenes imaginable. The trees and hedge rows with their coat of shining green foliage are alive with songsters, the meadows and pastures are crowned with verdure and the fields of small grain are radiant with promises of a bountiful harvest. The corn alone is backward but even that is beginning to shoot up under the influence of the recent warm rains and bright sunshine. Fields of early potatoes look extra well and the prospects for a fruit crop were never better.

Fishing in the Kishwaukee is a popular pastime with many people this spring. The fish are plentiful and large strings of good ones are taken each day.

A double wedding will be celebrated at Sycamore today in which a quartet of DeKalb’s young people will take the leading part. Olof Olsen, the well-known jeweler, will take unto himself a wife in the person of Miss Ellen Munson and at the same time and place Ben Peterson will be joined to Miss Mary Johnson.

George Townsend sustained a heavy loss this week in the death of his pure-bred Percheron stallion. The horse weighed over a ton and was valued at $3,000.

Judge G.H. Hill, of Kingston, an old pioneer and the first assessor and treasurer of DeKalb county, died last Thursday.

100 years ago

June 1, 1910

“Doctor” Matthews, a colored chiropodist who has been making visits to DeKalb for some time, made himself rather obnoxious in a home in the eastern part of the city late yesterday afternoon and the police were called. It seems that the “doctor” did not take occasion to go through the formality of rapping and walked unannounced into the home. After giving him an examination the police escorted him to the edge of the city and sent him on his way to Shabbona with the information that he need not make DeKalb on his next trip.

Prof. N.D. Gilbert will deliver the commencement address at Kingston on Friday evening June 10th.

Yesterday there was issued from the circuit clerks office five first and two second naturalization papers. Today there are five or six more persons, mostly from DeKalb, seeking to become citizens of this great republic.

There is going to be some ball game at the Leonard Park on the coming Saturday afternoon when the DeKalb Elk baseball team will meet the Union Giants. The Elk team will be a fast one and the Union Giants are pretty fast when they are in their normal condition. The Giants will have with them for the occasion old Bill Joiner, the famous colored comedian whose funny cracks are enough to give the hearers their money’s worth without any additional attractions in the line of baseball playing.

75 years ago

June 1, 1935
The DeKalb Chamber of Commerce desires to know the name and address of every man and woman in this community who is skilled in stitching, cutting, finishing, treeing and associated type of work in a shoe factory. This information is required immediately, it was announced today.

John Summerfield who ordinarily operates a taxi service here, but who went to work at the J.V. Patten Company, lost the ends of four fingers in a sheet metal cutter at the plant yesterday. The shock unnerved him but other than the loss of the members of his left hand he was not so seriously injured but what he recovered rapidly enough. An official of the plant described the accident as one of those things that will happen every now and then.

Mrs. Wayne Montgomery, who resides north of Genoa, was called to Elgin on Wednesday on account of the accidental shooting and resulting death of her brother, James Smith. Mr. Smith, with his wife and two children, were preparing to leave for California and Mr. Smith was taking two of his guns to the home of his parents, when one which he did not know was loaded discharged, striking him in the chest.

With the first of June, news of coming weddings is uppermost in the minds of many DeKalb folk. Today, Miss Frances Conlin became the bride of Edward McGirr and Miss Marie Palm was united in marriage to Levi Elliott of Elburn.

Making use of flowers to camouflage the huge digester tank at the DeKalb Sanitary Sewer Treatment plan, Donn Hen, manager, has been successful in bringing a park like appearance to a place that might be an eyesore. Today, with the columbine in bloom, the huge tank structure gives the appearance of an elevated garden, the 500 plants presenting a most pleasing appearance, as well as solving the question of plant growth for several years to come.
– Daily Chronicle

25 years ago

May 29, 1985
Approximately 273 seniors will graduate from DeKalb High School at 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 4, in the high school gymnasium. Commencement speaker is Robert Brayfield, former DeKalb High School principal who retired last year.

The 1985 graduating class of Sycamore High School will receive diplomas at 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 4, in the high school gymnasium. Approximately 196 students will graduate. Commencement speakers will be Julie Marchiando, Stephanie Ward, James Alwan and James McCarter.

Commencement exercises for the 1985 Genoa-Kingston High School graduating class will be held at 8 p.m. Friday, May 31 in the high school auditorium. Approximately 74 seniors will graduate.
– The MidWeek

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