Events

Green Lens film series back at the Egyptian

The Green Lens film series will return to DeKalb next month with seven current films about social and environmental issues.

The films will be shown free of charge at 7 p.m. Thursdays beginning Sept. 12 at the Egyptian Theatre, 135 N. Second St. in DeKalb. Donations are welcome.

Audience members are invited to stay after the films for discussions with specialists from Northern Illinois University and the surrounding community.

The schedule includes:

• Sept. 12 – “Separated: Children at the Border,” 2018, directed by Marcela Gaviria, 53 minutes. This Frontline documentary explores what has happened to immigrant children separated from their parents at the border. The film shows the impact of Trump’s “zero tolerance” policy, and how both Trump and Obama dealt with minors at the border. 

• Sept. 19 – “H2O MX,” 2014, directed by Jose Cohen, 82 minutes. This award-winning film details how Mexico City, a mega-city of 22 million people, is struggling to become water sustainable. 

• Sept. 26 – “Happening: A Clean Energy Revolution,” 2017, directed by Jamie Redford, 71 minutes. This film is a colorful personal journey into the dawn of the clean energy era as it creates jobs, turns profits and makes U.S. communities stronger and healthier.

• Oct. 3 – “Divide and Conquer: The Story of Roger Ailes,” 2018, directed by Alexis Bloom, 107 minutes. This powerful film fuses the personal, political and surreal as it charts the rise and fall of Fox News chairman Roger Ailes.

• Oct. 10 – “Rise of the Superstorms: Nova,” 2018, directed by Liesl Clark, 53 minutes. In summer 2017, three monster hurricanes – Harvey, Irma and Maria – swept in from the Atlantic, shattering storm records and killing hundreds of people. 

• Oct. 17 – “Paris to Pittsburgh,” 2018, directed by Sidney Beaumont and Michael Bonfiglio, 77 minutes. This film brings to life the impassioned efforts of individuals who are battling the most severe threats of climate change in their own backyards.

• Oct. 23 – “Little Pink House,” 2017, directed by Courtney Moorehead Balaker, 98 minutes. A small-town nurse, Susette Kelo (played by Catherine Keener), emerges as the reluctant leader of her working-class neighbors in their struggle and eventual Supreme Court fight to save their homes from political and corporate interests bent on seizing the land and handing it over to Pfizer Corp. 

The Green Lens Environmental and Social Justice Film Series is sponsored by DeKalb’s Tapa La Luna Restaurant and the NIU Department of Communication Studies, with logistical support provided by the Egyptian Theatre and DeKalb Stands, an Indivisible group.

For information, email dekalbstands@gmail.com.

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