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Sycamore Scout completes Eagle project

Sam Frankovich of Boy Scout Troop 2810 recently built a storage shed for Cornerstone Christian Academy in Sycamore for his Eagle Scout project.
Sam Frankovich of Boy Scout Troop 2810 recently built a storage shed for Cornerstone Christian Academy in Sycamore for his Eagle Scout project.

SYCAMORE – Sam Frankovich, a Boy Scout from Troop 2810 chartered out of Salem Lutheran Church in Sycamore, recently completed his Eagle project. He built a storage shed to benefit Cornerstone Christian Academy before he and his family moved out of the area.

Cornerstone is a private Christian school in Sycamore that Frankovich attended. After recognizing a need, he spoke to administrator Tom Olmstead and facilities director Drew Whitfield and they planned out the storage project. Wanting to make the shed permanent and sturdy, they arranged for a concrete floor to be poured and the materials needed to create the barn-like building. All told, the project budget was planned to total $4,000, a substantial sum. The school pledged $2,000, if Frankovich could fundraise the additional $2,000. He did so with the help of his family, school and church community.

After the building permit was obtained, several work days with volunteers were planned, with Boy Scout of America regulations followed in regards to youth using power tools. After the concrete foundation was laid and set, the 12-by-20-foot storage shed was constructed with rafters and siding on the outside. Now the school has a secure place to store their sports equipment, extra chairs and riding mower, which is a huge help to the academy.

An undertaking of this size meant that construction equipment was needed. Tom Mullis, of Mullis Construction, stepped in to provide general contracting support, while Frankovich and his volunteers were able to borrow equipment from them. Lowe’s provided all the building materials at cost, which saved a considerable amount, while Ozinga Concrete donated about $1,000 worth of material to the project. The project came in under budget at $3,500 and Frankovich donated the excess funds to the school.

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