Campus Notebook

Pinning ceremony for Kish College phlebotomy grads

Six students received pins in a ceremony on June 28 at Kishwaukee College in recognition of their completion of the Phlebotomy Technician program for certified nursing assistants. The students are pictured with their instructor, Corie Thibeault (back row, second from left), and Melissa Gallagher, coordinator of short-term training at Kishwaukee College (back row, third from left).
Six students received pins in a ceremony on June 28 at Kishwaukee College in recognition of their completion of the Phlebotomy Technician program for certified nursing assistants. The students are pictured with their instructor, Corie Thibeault (back row, second from left), and Melissa Gallagher, coordinator of short-term training at Kishwaukee College (back row, third from left).

Kishwaukee College held a pinning ceremony on June 28 for students who completed the Phlebotomy Technician Program for certified nursing assistants.

The students receiving pins were Jordyn Bergstrand, Denise Gul, Ingrid Torres and Cambria Williamson of DeKalb; Tanya Carraher of Kingston, and Cassandra Butters of Sycamore.

The tradition of pinning healthcare graduates originates with the nursing profession in 1860, when Florence Nightingale presented lapel pins to her best students. Over the years, other healthcare professions have added the practice to their graduation traditions to symbolize an official initiation into the students’ chosen healthcare profession.

The Phlebotomy Technician Program for certified nursing assistants was developed to allow CNAs to add the phlebotomy tech certification to their skill set to enhance employment opportunities. Phlebotomists are health care professionals who have been trained to collect, transport, handle and process blood and other specimens for laboratory analysis using venipuncture and micro collection techniques.

The class was created especially for CNAs who had received their training under the federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act to make the dual specialization financially accessible. Under the regulations of the act, eligible participants can only receive funding for one short-term training program. First National Bank in DeKalb provided grant funding to allow area opportunity act-trained CNAs to enroll in the phlebotomy tech program for free.

For more information on the phlebotomy technician or other short-tern training programs offered at Kishwaukee College, contact Coordinator Melissa Gallagher at 815-825-9466 or melissa.gallagher@kishwaukeecollege.edu.

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